The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts
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    OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT MONDAY 09:00 - 17:00
    OPEN EVERY DAY EXCEPT MONDAY 09:00 - 17:00

    What Can I See?

    The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, housed in Ibrahim Pasha Palace, has the unique distinction of being both the last museum to be opened in the era of the Ottoman Empire and also the first Turkish museum to bring together Turkish and Islamic works. At the entrance to the exhibition rooms, in the Museum Founders Section, you will be greeted on foot by members of the advisory board management committee that founded the museum and opened it up to the public. The Raqqa and Samarra Section exhibits works found during archaeological digs at these important settlements of the Early Islamic Period. The reconstruction of the Raqqa and Samarra excavations takes you back in time to when the works were found. The Damascus Manuscripts Section contains works brought from Damascus Umayyad Mosque and gives you the chance to see some rare and outstanding manuscripts. Wherever you go in the museum, you will have the opportunity to examine hundreds of works of Turkish and Islamic art at close hand. The Holy Relics section includes the Prophet Muhammad’s foot print, known as Kadem-i Saadet, and the hairs of his beard, known as Sakal-ı Şerif, along with a book of Salavat prayers, Salavat-ı Şerif. The Divanhane was the place for the meetings and functions of Ibrahim Pasha, Grand Vizier to Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. Now in the Divanhâne Section, you can see at close hand valuable carpets, ceramics, metal, wood, glass, stone and written works from the Anatolian Seljuk and Ottoman Periods. From the glass ceiling of the courtyard and at the entrance-level Hippodrome Remains Section, you have the opportunity to see remains of the Constantinople Hippodrome that were excavated in 2014. In the museum courtyard, you can also take the opportunity to marvel at the hollow body of the approximately 200-year old plane tree. From the stairs by the exit to the museum display rooms, you will be able to take a photograph of the magnificent view of The Blue Mosque. Brimming with precious works of Turkish and Islamic art and open seven days a week, the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts is waiting for you in all its splendour.

    What Can I See?

    The Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, housed in Ibrahim Pasha Palace, has the unique distinction of being both the last museum to be opened in the era of the Ottoman Empire and also the first Turkish museum to bring together Turkish and Islamic works. At the entrance to the exhibition rooms, in the Museum Founders Section, you will be greeted on foot by members of the advisory board management committee that founded the museum and opened it up to the public. The Raqqa and Samarra Section exhibits works found during archaeological digs at these important settlements of the Early Islamic Period. The reconstruction of the Raqqa and Samarra excavations takes you back in time to when the works were found. The Damascus Manuscripts Section contains works brought from Damascus Umayyad Mosque and gives you the chance to see some rare and outstanding manuscripts. Wherever you go in the museum, you will have the opportunity to examine hundreds of works of Turkish and Islamic art at close hand. The Holy Relics section includes the Prophet Muhammad’s foot print, known as Kadem-i Saadet, and the hairs of his beard, known as Sakal-ı Şerif, along with a book of Salavat prayers, Salavat-ı Şerif. The Divanhane was the place for the meetings and functions of Ibrahim Pasha, Grand Vizier to Sultan Suleiman the Magnificent. Now in the Divanhâne Section, you can see at close hand valuable carpets, ceramics, metal, wood, glass, stone and written works from the Anatolian Seljuk and Ottoman Periods. From the glass ceiling of the courtyard and at the entrance-level Hippodrome Remains Section, you have the opportunity to see remains of the Constantinople Hippodrome that were excavated in 2014. In the museum courtyard, you can also take the opportunity to marvel at the hollow body of the approximately 200-year old plane tree. From the stairs by the exit to the museum display rooms, you will be able to take a photograph of the magnificent view of The Blue Mosque. Brimming with precious works of Turkish and Islamic art and open seven days a week, the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts is waiting for you in all its splendour.